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Lyon - riverside - g.h. photo

Practicals

Transport

On the road, Lyon is 465 km (290 mi) from Paris, a 4-hour 45-minute drive. From Paris, by TGV, the super-fast train, the travel is just 1 hour 45 minutes to Lyon.

Lyon - railway station - Gare De Lyon Part Dieu - g.s. photo

Lyon - Lafayette Bridge over the Rhône - g.s. photo

Lyon - funicular - b.a. photo

Food


“Gastro-fetishists may stone me, but it was at the Sunday market by the banks of the Saône where I really felt at home. I soaked up all the aromas of bread, fruit, and every kind of roasted or baked delight. There’s no point trying to stick to a shopping list – you’re sure to be tempted by too many things, and end up buying half the market. It’s impossible to get enough of the brightly colored stacks of fruit and vegetables, the wonderful bread stalls, and of course most of all those wonderful cheese selections.

The vendors are friendly, and you can sample their wares, but they’re also happy to just chat with passers-by. Once your shopping basket is full, it’s good to sit down by the riverside and chat with one of the young sellers. The downtown market shuts at around 2 pm, whereupon the market women disappear, and the cleaning company shows up. Within an hour the riverside is spotless again as if the market had never been.

Perhaps it’s a boring cliché to praise French cheeses, but I can’t help saying a word or two about them. The fact is, it’s pretty sobering to realize that even the cheapest local cheese sold at this little local market is light years ahead of the best cheese we can find in a supermarket. And what’s so surprising is that for a very reasonable price you can get a rich, creamy, delicious comté, aged eighteen months – and it costs less than the ‘premium’, rubbery stuff we can get back home.”


Shopping

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Lyon - shopping - g.s. photo

Others

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Lyon - creative wall - g.s. photo

Background

Lyon - grand view - l.n. photo

Lyon - Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) - g.s. photo

Destination in brief

Lyon is located in the eastern part of central France.

Population (in 2020): 472,300 in the city area and 1.7 million in the urban area

Lyon is a university city, with at least 120,000 students.

Average net monthly salary (in 2020): 2100 Euro - ( France average: 2000 Euro) 

Lyon’s historic old town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


History

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Lyon - Place Bellecour with the statue of the Sun King, Louis XIV - g.s. photo

Nowadays

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Lyon - Palace of Commerce (Palais de la Bourse) - g.s. photo

People

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Lyon - in medieval costumes - c.f. photo

Lyon - the knights have a beer - h.s. photo

Attractions

Old Town (Vieux Lyon)

On the far bank of the Saône, the real attraction of Lyon awaits us: Vieux Lyon, the old town, with its huge cathedral at the summit. This district, with its medieval and Renaissance buildings, narrow streets, alleyways, and charming cobblestones, transports all its visiting tourists centuries into the past – it’s no wonder that this area has been designated a UNESCO world heritage site.

What really sets this medieval district apart is that locals still live in the houses, as though it’s quite natural, and between the ridiculously expensive restaurants there are also some very affordable little pubs. Directly next to the cathedral of Saint-Jean-Baptiste, for instance, we found a little café (actually more like a pub), which sold drinks for what by French standards were very reasonable prices (a glass of wine, for instance, cost €2.70).

Another thing which is both unusual and progressive in such a place is that when it comes to exploring the heritage, there is not merely a plain history museum, but also, for instance, a really imaginative Miniature Museum, right in the middle of the old town. (€9 for adults, €6.50 for children) which displays both historical and modern figures, occupations, and spaces. Everyone gapes at it with open mouths – even the adults.

And if you’re in the old town, note an important word: traboule. Traboules are the passageways which you can find throughout the city, and which make unpredictable links between different streets. Every traboule has its own story, and you can pay for a special traboule tour.

In this old district alone there are some 250 traboules, and twice as many in the city as a whole. Here’s the rule for finding traboules: everywhere is open if it isn’t physically barred. Most locals don’t mind if they find tourists taking selfies on a traboule which leads across the stairway of their apartment building – they’re used to it. (2016)


Lyon - Old Town - g.m. photo

Lyon - Old Town (Vieux Lyon) - m.m. photo

Lyon - Old Town - w.e. photo

Lyon - t.c. photo

Les Halles de Lyon Paul Bocuse

Lyon - Les Halles de Lyon Paul Bocuse - m.a. photo

Fourviere Hill with the Basilica (Basilique Notre Dame de Fourviere)

Lyon - The Basilica of Notre-Dame de Fourvière (La Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvière) - g.s. photo

Quartier Renaissance Saint Jean

Parc de la Tete d'Or

Churches

Lyon - Church of Saint Bonaventure (Église Saint-Bonaventure) - g.s. photo

Lyon - - Church of Saint Nizier - g.s. photo

Lyon - Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Jean-Baptiste) - g.s. photo

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